more dyeing classes!

Hello! It’s been ages since I’ve posted here about dyeing… it’s been a really busy few months and we spent most of our end-of-year break painting our house, so neither dyeing nor writing about it have had much of a look-in… I’ve also got into the habit of posting photos on Instagram, which is so quick that I’ve realized it’s made the idea of writing an actual blog post overwhelming! Of course, it isn’t- I just need to get back into the habit ; )

I ran another class on natural dyes in December, this time for the Handmakers Factory at the lovely Ink and Spindle studio in Kensington. I think I’ve said here before that I don’t consider myself a natural teacher- I get very nervous and compensate by being way too serious ; ) But I feel really passionate about the need for good classes and skill-sharing so I push myself to get better at it. But you know, teaching this class was an absolute joy! I think perhaps that my love for plants and colour managed to override my nerves- it was great!

This time, I played around with some basic sample sheets that participants could attach their samples to- it’s always so hard to remember what they are and how they were dyed so I thought it would be useful. Each one relates to a particular dye plant that we used on the day.

The first plant we dyed with was Oxalis pes-caprae (Soursob or Sourgrass), which is a widespread weed in Melbourne. I realize I need to start taking photos of the dye plants I use as an ID tool for the blog and classes but Soursob is small herb with a clover-like leaf and bright acid-yellow bell-shaped flowers in spring. I collected about 500gm of flowers in spring and then froze them for the classes I had later in the year (and, in case you’re wondering, I find I get the same results with fresh or frozen flowers).

We poured hot water over about 2 handfuls of flowers and left them to soak for an hour while we did other things- I don’t like to apply much heat to flowers as heating them too high or for too long can destroy or alter the dye compounds. We then strained the flowers out and placed the dyebath onto the stove on low and added two sets of samples of alum-mordanted yarn (wool, wool/ silk and bamboo) and fabric (silk velvet, silk, coarse cotton and unbleached linen). We left them to heat for around 45 minutes and then took them off to cool. We then removed the fibers, put one set aside, added some washing soda to the dyebath (which changed the pH to alkaline and instantly turned from yellow to bright orange!) and replaced the other set back into the bath. You can clearly see the difference in colours achieved from the different fibre types and pHs; interestingly, this plant seems to have more of an affinity with protein fibres, like silk and wool, whereas the cellulose fibres (especially the cotton) didn’t take up as much colour.

Soursob

Soursob

Next up, we used Eucalyptus cinerea (Argyle Apple), which is found though the south-east of Australia and is often used as a landscape tree in streets. It yields far better colour when heated and cooled multiple times so I took it into the studio already soaked and heated over several days to maximize the depth of dye we could achieve. We simply brought it up to about 80C, then added a set of alum-mordanted yarn and fabrics and a piece of iron-mordanted yarn and took it off the heat to sit for 2 hours. I would have liked to keep it in the heat but my second stove refused to work on the day so we had to juggle pots! The dark brown yarn at the top right was iron-mordanted and took up colour very differently to the same yarn mordanted with alum.

Eucalyptus cinerea

Eucalyptus cinerea

And we used chlorophyll as our last dye, as I wanted to demonstrate dyeing with a weed (Soursob), an indigenous landscape plant (Argyle Apple) and a vegetable and I couldn’t get hold of my favourite purple carrot (more on recent experiments with that next time). I sacrificed some of the chlorophyll extract from wonderful French natural dye house Renaissance Dyeing that I’ve been hoarding since my lovely friend Mel gave me a pack of them.  It’s produced from organically grown spinach and nettles and was very simple to work with, giving us lovely, soft green, that most elusive of colours when it comes to natural dyes!

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll

As I said, it was such a joy to teach this class and I think everyone got a lot of confidence to get out and try dyeing with natural materials, which is mostly what people need, as it’s actually pretty simple! If you are keen to learn about the process in a hands-on session, I have some classes coming up at the Handmakers Factory, the first one at the beginning of February- you can find all the details here. I’m also playing with the idea of running a class on how to get 25 (or more) colours from one dyebath, so let me know if that sounds like something you’d be keen to do.

I’ll be back soon with exciting and not-so-exciting results from recent dye experiments…. And for those in Melbourne, enjoy the cool change that is just blowing in!!! Too many days above 40C this week!

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8 Responses to more dyeing classes!

  1. Sooz says:

    Great colours! I’ve picked up some yarn for dyeing here in nz so looking forward to some exploration!!

  2. Tony says:

    You didn’t seem nervous or serious at all in the class I came too!

    I’m afraid I haven’t got around to any experimenting yet, but I must soon. Yes!

  3. flk says:

    Would love to attend one of your classes, Jules. Yes, PLEASE.

  4. kgirlknits says:

    Love the end colour using the chlorophyll! What a beautiful green.

    And despite maybe not *feeling* like a natural teacher, I think you actually might be just that ;).

  5. Nice to get your teaching groove. :D Sounds like the class was wonderful.

  6. Belinda says:

    wow! a dyebath with over 25 different colours?! i’m intrigued! fingers crossed i’ll be down in melbourne again when you run that class!! xx

  7. I love dye classes … I always learn so much !

  8. soewnearth says:

    You can get powdered chlorophyll in some health food shops.

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